Nick Nunn, Nunnsense

Nick Nunn, Nunnsense

By Nick Nunn, Columnist

The holidays are coming to a close. By the time this has printed, the new year will have been ushered in, and we will be without any national holiday until Martin Luther King Day on Jan. 21.

Resolutions will still be fresh and – when we neglect them – painful for our pride. And what is number one on a lot of peoples’ list of resolutions?

Lose that winter pudge accumulated during the holiday season, of course. It might be the cruelest trick of the architects, who devised the Gregorian calendar, to split the year in the middle of the winter, with the coldest months still ahead.

Surely, they had no idea that modern-day people would look to that “Jan. 1” marking as a day of rebirth, when the sins and failures of the previous year could be washed away by deciding simply that, this year, they are going to try a little bit harder.

Oh, the cruel nature of the artifice! It doesn’t even make sense to begin the year in the middle of a dead season. Why not the beginning of spring? Even the end of autumn would make more sense! And here is where it affects us – well, me at least – the most: I’ve got some winter pudge to lose and, wouldn’t you know it, on the top of my list of resolutions it stands coyly “lose a little weight.”

How much? Well… I’ll know when I get there. But one thing stands squarely in my way, which causes two problems to my aspirations of slimming down: winter. Yep. And it plans to get me in two ways.

First, my body tells me that it wants to go into hibernation mode until spring and that I need to fatten up for the long sleep, so there are days when, no matter how much I eat, I still feel like I’m hungry. And second, it’s cold out there.

How am I expected to go out into the world and exercise or take a walk and enjoy it while my feet are cold? So, I hang up my coat, clean out the refrigerator, and get back into the bed on a cool-ish Saturday instead of going on a nice, leisurely walk.

Sounds good, right? And just like that, my resolutions have been dashed on the rocky reality of New Year’s Day according to the Gregorian calendar – my newest excuse for lazing about. Inertia is a beast. But I’ve found that the best way to deal with resolutions of any sort is by making a habit of them. And, when making or breaking a habit, there’s a simple, useful word of advice: “one day at a time.”

As tiring as the thought of going for a 30-minute walk each and every day for the next month may be, it won’t seem as difficult to just put your shoes on right now and head out the door. And before you know it, hopefully, you’ve developed yourself a good habit that will stick with you as long as you need it to.