To the Editor:

The title of the article “Toothless Canadians” jumped off the page when I glanced at the Sport’s section of the April 3rd paper. Not only did I view it as a derogatory statement but also it can be viewed as stereotyping our good neighbors to the north. Nowhere in the article are Canadians mentioned and one can only deduce that Mr. Nunn assumes all hockey players at the semi-pro and professional levels are Canadians, and all Canadian hockey players have lost some or all of their teeth playing the game. Wrong. While modern-day hockey originated in Canada, the original concept of a game involving sticks and a ball played on ice originated in Europe. Today’s professional hockey players originate from Canada, U.S.A., Russia and many European countries. One only needs to look at the mens’ Olympic hockey teams and the number of NHL players on those teams to see they come from many different countries. Lastly, most of these players still have all or the majority of their teeth. Mr. Nunn needs to be writing about sporting events that he is more familiar with and research his subjects prior to putting pen to paper.

Joe Houston

Canadian-American

Madison