Nick Nunn

Nick Nunn

By Nick Nunn

I’ve always thought that exile is one of the best ways to punish those that break the law.

(Not all law-breakers, of course, just the ones that do something bad enough to deserve it.)

Just think about what the punishment does: it says to the lawbreaker, “you have broken the rules of our society, so you can no longer be part of it.”

Perfect. It simply ostracizes those elements of society who have proven themselves unworthy of the protections, comforts, and benefits of society and tells them “get out!”

Society goes back to operating normally, and the exiled person must find their way on their own.

It is only too bad that the world is now so densely populated that exile doesn’t really make as much sense as a realistic punishment as it used to.

I mean, you can ban someone from a country, but most countries seem the same these days, so I can’t imagine that any country would want someone who has been driven out of other places for being a nuisance.

Also, the role of exile has been taken over by prisons, which is punishment’s way of “keeping your enemies close.”

The United Kingdom has taken a qualified step back towards using exile as a punishment again by banning one of its citizens from all and any properties where farm animals reside.

Why? Oh, I think you can guess why.

If it helps any: it was with a goat.

23-year-old Robert Newman – not to be confused with Randy Newman (although that would be funnier) – will also have to maintain a curfew from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m.

Apparently, UK police are worried that, if Newman is out in the moonlight, he will turn into a were-goat.