By Tia Lynn Lecorchick Staff writer

“This is a good way to get out and talk to the kids, especially right now, as we are entering the severe weather peak of the year,” said Milone. “We want to educate kids about staying safe during severe storms.” Milone talked to the students about how to recognize storm clouds, how tornadoes form, the best places to be during a storm, and preparing ahead of time with their families. “The lower can you be the better.

You want to be on the lowest level of your home, away from windows. If you are in a hotel or an apartment, we recommend laying flat in a bathtub with a mattress on top,” suggested Milone. Milone urged the children to protect their heads above all else in case of a weather emergency like a tornado. “You should have a safe place in your home where you keep what you need during a storm. It may not look cool, but a helmet is a really good thing to keep in your safe place. If you break your arm, it can be fixed. If you break you leg, it can be fixed. But if you break your brain, well, you can’t fix that,” said Milone.

Milone stressed the importance of preparing ahead of time with the entire family. “Talk to your parents. Decide ahead of time where to go in the home or where to meet if you have to go outside.” said Milone. Milone also encouraged the children to pursue their education. “As weather people, we always stress physics and math. But most of all, in today’s world, know your computer.

Everything is done with computers. Make sure you learn about that,” said Milone. After the talk, Milone let the students climb inside the weather alert van parked outside. ­­He showed them how the van works and how they use the van to report on severe weather storms. “The kids just love this kind of thing,” said Nancy Nunn, MCES teacher. “It’s good for them to learn about this.”