By Tia Lyn Lecorchick staff writer

The Buckhead City Council is currently exploring alternate options before settling on whether or not to proceed with constructing a new well for the city. If the city chooses to construct a new well, it could cost up to $240,000, according to Alex Wiseman, a representative from Carter & Slope Consulting Engineers, who presented his companies’ assessment at January’s council meeting. “It’s an expensive project.

We need to consider all of our options,” said Ricky Walker, mayor of Buckhead. Walker suggested increasing their usage of Madison’s water supply for a few years instead of constructing a new well. “We are already tied to Madison’s water, paying around $300 per month for it. I think we should look into what is costs to use a filtration system to get the Madison water to taste better and just use Madison water,” said Walker.

“What we are looking at is seeing if we can still use our well, but buy enough water from Madison per day and get filtration to treat it, so everyone would be happy with the water we are receiving.” Chuck Jarrell, director of planning and development for the Morgan County Board of Commissioners, found Walker’s proposal to be a solid possibility for the city of Buckhead. “That may be a more viable option for you than putting in an expensive well,” said Jarrell.

“We just want to weigh every option out before we go forward with this,” said Walker. While the council will hold off on rendering a decision just yet, they approved two expenditures to improve the city: $1400 for a roof extension for the fire department and $4800 for a new city lawnmower. The roof extension will be paid for with funds from last year’s Old Buckhead Day and the lawnmower will be paid for with funds from the Local Option Sales Tax (LOST) fund. “We want to make sure the city has everything it needs,” said Walker.

Walker also reported that the city park renovation project has been completed, which cost $9500. “It is finally up to state standards and it looks great. It looks like nobody could get hurt,” said Walker. To get the park up to state standards and compliant with Americans with Disabilities Act, a wheel chair accessible ramp needed to be built and playground equipment re-situated.